Dave Russo Art

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BIOGRAPHY

EVENTS

 

 


NEW RELEASES

Uncle Ebenezer Poster
Bela Fleck Poster

DYLAN LYRIC SERIES

PET PORTRAITS

EVENT POSTERS


LANDSCAPE SERIES

Covered Bridges
Dominican Ruins
Northampton MA
Ashfield MA
Brattleboro VT

Mayan Ruins
Niagara Falls
Arizona
Skylines
Phields
Music Venues


PORTRAITS

Main Portait Gallery
Lot Artifacts
Frank Zappa
Les Claypool
PHISH


GREETING CARDS

Christmas

ETSY STORE

POSTCARDS FROM THE HANGING
Bob Dylan Lyric Illustrations


Stuck Inside Of Mobile

Visions Of Johanna

Desolation Row

Simple Twist Of Fate

Tombstone Blues

Tangled Up In Blue

Hurricane

Like A Rolling Stone

Highway 61 Revisited

Mr Tambourine Man

 
PURCHASE HERE

 

Desolation Row

...Cinderella, she seems so easy,
"It takes one to know one, " she smiles

And puts her hands in her back pockets
Bette Davis style

And in comes Romeo, he's moaning.
"You Belong to Me I Believe"

And someone says, "You're in the wrong place,
my friend, you'd better leave"

And the only sound that's left
after the ambulances go

Is Cinderella sweeping up
on Desolation Row
...

by Bob Dylan

 

 

ORIGINAL: $200
11x15" Prismacolor Marker and Micron Pen on Watercolor paper.

PRINTS
Archival ink on acid free paper
11x14" print: $40
8x10" print: $30
5x7" print: $20

Ships USPS
Purchase here

Synopsis by the artist

If Google Street View had a time travel function, you could search for many of the characters and businesses in this song's many verses. You would find most of them on Broadway / 42nd St in New York. This gives us two things to think about.

1) So many of the characters in the song are from classic theater, fairy tales, and Broadway Musicals. They interact with each other and with the scene on a colloquial level. It's as though the actors are walking around time square in the late hours after the show, only they're not actors. They're the actual Phantom of the Opera or Romeo.

2) In your Street View / Wayback app, you'll notice that it's not the same City it is today. In 1965, you can find the very rich living around the corner from the very poor.

The common thread in all these verses is that Desolation Row (perhaps poverty in general) seems to be a place that can be seen by outsiders but can't be understood unless it's your reality. I gotta hand it to Bob here. This is decades before people were commonly discussing the ignorance of privilege.

So here we are in this particular verse with my interpretation. Cinderella is a cleaning lady, probably an immigrant, in the process of flirting with someone who has something in common with her. Romeo, an upper class boy who rarely hears the word "no", assumes she's going to jump into his drunk arms as though she's won the lottery. Romeo gets his ass handed too him.

In the very last line, it occurs to me that Cinderella had no control over any of the situation. As is the case with anyone on Desolation Row.

- Dave Russo